Alternative development models & an aging population @ RMIT Design Hub

Alternative development models & an aging population @ RMIT Design Hub

If you are free on Friday September 21st at 12.30pm join me at In Conversation: Alternative Development Models & An Aging Population @ the RMIT Design Hub.

The last decade has seen a shift in the housing market. With property and construction a driving force of our country’s economy, many Australians have fallen victim to housing unaffordability and an oversaturation of low quality housing ‘product’. This has seen the arrival of alternative development models: sustainably driven, architect led and collectively minded. These models may be the alternative today, but could they become the new normal as our ageing population is priced out of traditional options in housing and retirement?

This final event for New Agency: Owning Your Future brings together various actors working in and around progressive and alternative housing development models. Designed to be an interactive conversation, audience members are encouraged to bring questions and comments for the panel.

Panelists:

  • Kath Sundermann, Associate Director at MGS Architects
  • Tim Riley, Director, Property Collectives
  • Quino Holland, Co-director of Assemble and Fieldwork

New Agency: Owning Your Future is a research platform by Sibling Architecture that investigates the future of dwelling through the lens of Australia’s ageing population.

Looking at alternative development models & aging population together is of particular interest to me. I see much scope for models like ours to enable downsizers to create intentional communities with family and friends while maintaining control over the location, design and built form outcomes of their project. We are seeing more and more interest in this space, and its exemplified by our first multi-typology multi-generational project, the Victoria St Collective @ Westwyck. These models could have a powerful role to play in providing a practical solution to introduce quality infill development into the “missing middle” suburbs. So I’m looking forward to the conversation…